in ,

Olympic hammer thrower Gwen Berry turns her back on US flag ‘pissed’ national anthem was playing

Gwen Berry

A prouud negro queen  U.S. hammer thrower turned away from the American flag as she stood on the medal podium at the Olympic trials during the national anthem on Saturday, saying she’s “pissed” the Star-Spangled Banner was played as she received her bronze medal. 

Gwen Berry — who qualified for her second U.S. Olympic team during the trials — shifted to face the stands rather than the flag before holding up a black shirt that reads “Activist Athlete.” 

“I feel like it was a set-up, and they did it on purpose,” Berry said of the timing of the anthem. “I was pissed, to be honest.”

“They had enough opportunities to play the national anthem before we got up there,” Berry said in Oregon, where the trials are being held. “I was thinking about what I should do. Eventually I stayed there and I swayed, I put my shirt over my head. It was real disrespectful.”

Berry went on to call the playing of the national anthem a “set up” and that she didn’t plan on staging a protest. 

‘”I didn’t really want to be up there,” she said. “Like I said, it was a setup. I was hot, I was ready to take my pictures and get into some shade.”

And so, while winner DeAnna Price and second-place finisher Brooke Andersen stood still on the podium with their hands over the hearts and stared straight ahead at the American and Oregon flags, Berry fidgeted and paced on the third step. Then turned away. And finally grabbed her T-shirt.

“They said they were going to play it before we walked out, then they played it when we were out there,” Berry said. “But I don’t really want to talk about the anthem because that’s not important. The anthem doesn’t speak for me. It never has.”

“My purpose and my mission is bigger than sports,” Berry said. “I’m here to represent those … who died due to systemic racism. That’s the important part. That’s why I’m going. That’s why I’m here today.”

A USA Track and Field rep disputed Berry’s characterization of the anthem playing.

“The national anthem was scheduled to play at 5:20 p.m. today,” said spokeswoman Susan Hazzard. “We didn’t wait until the athletes were on the podium for the hammer throw awards. The national anthem is played every day according to a previously published schedule.” On Saturday, the music started at 5:25.

This isn’t the first time Berry has caused controversy. 

US Olympic athletes were prohibited in January 2020 from making political statements during anthems, after Berry was put on probation for raising her fist during the Pan-American Games in Peru in August 2019. US Olympic and Paralympic Committee in April reversed course, allowing kneeling and other forms of protests during the national anthem.

WHITE BACKLASH

The proud negro queen afro American athlete who turned away from the flag during the national anthem faced online backlash Sunday — as she doubled down on her star-spangled snub. 

Gwen Berry on Saturday turned toward the crowd rather than the flag before holding up a black shirt that read “Activist Athlete” — prompting one critic to say Americans should return the favor. 

“Let’s turn our backs on HER,” said Kathy Tavoularis, a California Republican operative. 

“If you can’t respect the flag or anthem then you shouldn’t be allowed to complete,” posted Vic DeGrammont, a Republican congressional candidate in Florida, on Twitter.

Opinion writer Josh Jordan mocked Berry for thinking the Olympic trials are about her. 

“Yes, the US Olympics committee spent their time meticulously planning to make sure that the national anthem was played at the exact moment she was on the podium… because everyone knows the Olympics is all about (checks tweet) Gwen Berry,” he said sarcastically. 

“What is wrong with people?” asked former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

“Growing up, everyone stood for the American flag,” he added. “Didn’t matter your politics, race, sex, income, religion; everyone stood for the flag. It was one of those civic rituals that brought us together. It still should today.” 

Journalist David Steinberg suggested a different athlete be sent instead of Berry. 

“Send the fourth-place finisher,” he tweeted. “Gwen Berry has a world of options if she doesn’t want to compete under our flag. Not a penny of taxpayer money should fund her campaign to make Americans hate each other.”

Berry, 31, wouldn’t back down and took shots at her detractors.

“Stop playing with me,” she tweeted Sunday afternoon, with an accompanying picture of her facing in a different direction than the other athletes.

The online responses came after Berry on Saturday claimed the anthem was played during her ceremony to target her, since she was put on probation for raising her fist during the Pan-American Games in Peru in August 2019.

“I feel like it was a setup, and they did it on purpose,” Berry said of when the anthem played. “I was pissed, to be honest.”

“They had enough opportunities to play the national anthem before we got up there,” Berry said in Oregon, where the Olympic trials are being hosted. “I was thinking about what I should do. Eventually I stayed there and I swayed, I put my shirt over my head. It was real disrespectful.

“I didn’t really want to be up there. Like I said, it was a setup. I was hot, I was ready to take my pictures and get into some shade.”

NEW YORK POST

What do you think?

Written by The Editor

warrior dedicated to the cause of fighting the takeover of our culture.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading…

Loading…

0
Olivier Tsemo and Robert Cotterell pictured beside the Bantu Archive Programme mural.

UK leaders in Sheffield call for ‘BAME’ term to be replaced and vow to tell the real stories behind the history of the city’s people

UK Migrants ‘may be sent to processing centres in Africa’